General

The Carl F. H. Henry Resident Fellowship supports new approaches to theological inquiry in the doctrine of creation that address foundational questions of the nature of the world,
as well as demonstrate theological humility and openness to the claims of science. As a resident fellowship community, the fellowship houses four concurrent research positions on Trinity’s campus, creating a collaborative, interdisciplinary research and learning environment.

Because of the doctrinal nature of the project and the objectives aspired to, our residency program will primarily be oriented towards philosophical and theological projects and disciplines (generally understood). The following fellowships will be awarded on a competitive basis: (i) Senior Resident Fellowship; and (ii) Resident Fellowship.

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Senior Resident Fellowship

Applicants for the Senior Resident Fellowship should be full-time tenured faculty members at accredited institutions of higher education and experts in the conversation. They should be interested in the pursuit of a research program that is relevant to the topic of inquiry and that advances the conversation while bringing new insights into the doctrine of creation, and they should be open to interdisciplinary discussions in theology (generally understood), philosophy, and the natural sciences.

Those eligible for the Senior Research Fellowship are also welcome to apply for the Research Fellowship.

Eligibility

  • Full-time tenured faculty members at accredited institutions of higher education;
  • Established research record in the area of creation and/or the specific topic of inquiry;
  • Open to interdisciplinary discussions in theology, philosophy, and the natural sciences;
  • University approval of course release for fellowship.

Responsibilities of Fellowship

  • The pursuit of a major research project, ordinarily to result in a monograph or several articles and essays;
  • Regular office hours (intended to foster an ethos of collaboration among Fellowship community);
  • Leadership at weekly Creation Project discussions with other resident fellows and faculty members and doctoral students at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School;
  • Availability to provide guidance and leadership in planning the content of annual public events and summer Dabar Conference;
  • Attendance at, and participation in, select Creation Project events.

Application Requirements

  • A cover letter explaining your interest in the program and fit with the overall program and specific theme;
  • A complete and current curriculum vitae;
  • A project abstract of no more than 150 words;
  • A statement between 1,200 and 1,500 words describing the project. The proposal should clearly state the relation between your research and the Center’s theme, the significance of the research, and the distinctive character of the argument advanced;
  • Names of three scholars who can serve as references for you.

NOTE: If your project is more introductory/popular than research oriented, then your project description must include a “hypothesis” about the social conditions that you wish to address and why you think this project will be able to do so.

Evaluation Criteria

  • Scholarly contributions within the scholar’s own field as it relates to the doctrine of creation;
  • Openness to interdisciplinary engagement, especially in relation to significant work in recent biology, primatology, physics, and other sciences;
  • The promise of new spiritual insights and progress for the sake of the church;
  • Helpfulness to ecclesial communities within evangelical circles on the relation of the doctrine of creation to important work in the natural sciences.


Quick Facts

  1. Year-long resident fellowship
  2. Two fellowships awarded annually
  3. 110% salary compensation (up to $100K)
  4. Up to $15K moving stipend
  5. Applications due Jan. 16

Resident Fellowship

Applicants for the Henry Research Fellowship program should ordinarily hold a PhD/ThD (in exceptional cases doctoral students may be considered), they should be interested in the pursuit of a research program that is relevant to the inquiry, and they should be open to interdisciplinary discussions in theology, philosophy, and the natural sciences. They should be interested in the pursuit of a research program that is relevant to the topic of inquiry and that advances the conversation while bringing new insights into the doctrine of creation, and they should be open to interdisciplinary discussions in theology (generally understood), philosophy, and the natural sciences.

Eligibility

  • Holds a PhD/ThD (in exceptional cases doctoral students may be considered);
  • Open to interdisciplinary discussions in theology, philosophy, and the natural sciences;
  • If currently employed, university approval of course release for fellowship.

Responsibilities of Fellows

  • The pursuit of a major research project, ordinarily to result in a monograph or several articles and essays;
  • Regular office hours (intended to foster an ethos of collaboration among the fellowship community);
  • Presence at weekly Creation Project discussions with other resident fellows and faculty members and doctoral students at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School;
  • Attendance at, and participation in, select Creation Project events.

Application Requirements

  • A cover letter explaining your interest in the program and offering a brief summary of your qualifications;
  • A complete and current curriculum vitae;
  • A project abstract of no more than 150 words;
  • A statement of 1,200-1,500 words describing the project. The proposal should clearly state the relation between your research and the Center’s theme, the significance of the research, and the distinctive character of the argument advanced;
  • Names of three scholars who can serve as references for you;

If the applicant has less than three years of experience in a tenure-track position, please also provide:

  • A paper (published or unpublished) that is representative of your best academic research and writing;
  • Letters of recommendation from three scholars listed above. These should address (a) your overall academic ability; (b) the merits of your proposed research program; and (c) your ability to make productive use of your time at the Henry Center.

NOTE: If your project is more introductory/popular than research oriented, then your project description must include a “hypothesis” about the social conditions that you wish to address and why you think this project will be able to do so.

Evaluation Criteria

  • Scholarly contributions within the scholar’s own field as it relates to the doctrine of creation;
  • Openness to interdisciplinary engagement, especially in relation to significant work in recent biology, primatology, physics, and other sciences;
  • The promise of new spiritual insights and progress for the sake of the church;
  • Helpfulness to ecclesial communities within evangelical circles on the relation of the doctrine of creation to important work in the natural sciences.

Quick Facts

  1. Four semester-long fellowships awarded annually
  2. May apply for 1 or 2 semesters
  3. $32K/semester
  4. Up to $5K moving stipend
  5. Applications due January 16

Regional Discussion Fellowship

The Regional Discussion Fellowship is currently full, and we are not accepting applications at this time. Thank you for your interest.

Trinity has gathered a resident fellowship community for the 2016-2017 academic year, addressing issues surrounding science and the doctrine of creation. Are you working in the doctrine of creation? interested in the relationship between science and the bible? Consider joining the Henry Regional Discussion Fellowship. Building off of the Creation Project’s team of resident scholars, the Discussion Fellowship is intended to foster collaborative, interdisciplinary conversation  that advances evangelical understanding of the doctrine of creation.

The fellowship will gather quarterly during the academic year for a half-day colloquium that includes discussion of recent books in the field, presentation of papers that are in progress, and other activities that will advance understanding and interdisciplinary engagement. All meals will be provided. Participants will receive reimbursement for travel and a stipend of $1,000.

Eligibility

Applicants for the Henry Discussion Fellowship should ordinarily be faculty members at accredited institutions of higher education, working in the general Chicagoland area (within four hours drive), and they should be interested in interdisciplinary discussions that involve theology, philosophy, and the natural sciences, and they should be interested in the broader dissemination of current and new insights. Both applicants who are currently engaged in the interdisciplinary conversation and those wishing to become acquainted with it are encouraged to apply.

Commitment Involves

  • Attendance at all quarterly meetings with other members of this group and with the Resident Fellows*;
  • Pre-reading of all selected material and group presentations;
  • The submission of one’s own work will also be strongly encouraged.

* Although complete attendence is not required at all four colloquia, privilege will be given to applicants who are able to do so. Additionally, the honorarium will be pro-rated based on attendance.

Application Requirements

  • A cover letter explaining your interest in the program, providing a summary of your qualifications, and stating what contribution you believe you would make to these discussions. The letter should not exceed 1,000 words;
  • A complete and current curriculum vitae.

Quick Facts

  1. Intended for scholars in the Chicagoland area
  2. Ten Fellowships awarded annually
  3. Four quarterly half-day colloquia
  4. $1,000 stipend + travel expenses
  5. Applications due June 15

Theme Topic

Reclaiming Theological Anthropology in an Age of Science

When many evangelical Christians think of “creation,” they immediately think of “evolution,” and they often do so in terms that are either dismissive of “evolution” or of “those ‘fundamentalists’ who don’t believe in evolution”—with retrenchment and close-mindedness following. Frequently, evangelical discussions of creation have failed to grasp key elements of the doctrine of creation; too often the “creation vs. evolution” controversy takes center stage and crowds out the very theological convictions that may help frame the controversial issues, increase intellectual humility and openness, and provide fertile ground for new explorations between theology and science. Year two will thus attend to critical elements of the historic Christian doctrine of creation (e.g., the goodness and contingency of creation, ex nihilo, divine action) and to important questions and potential challenges to those elements from modern science.

Kinds of Theological Questions

  • What are contemporary Christians to make of the biblical teaching that humans are created in the image of God? What—if anything—sets them apart from fellow creatures and renders homo sapiens distinct from other primates in an important theological sense?
  • How should Christians think about the human person (as body and “soul”) in light of both theological desiderata and the claims of science? What should Christians conclude about the nature of human personhood?
  • Was there a first set of humans, an historical Adam and Eve? Does biblical revelation and orthodox theology demand belief in such creatures (or is a “mythical” view of them consistent with Christian orthodoxy)? What does Genesis teach when properly understood?
  • What did Jesus and Paul think about these matters?
  • Exactly what is the consensus of the “state of the scientific studies” in evolutionary biology, primatology, and related fields? And—crucially—how are faithful Christians to relate the claims of the sciences to central theological affirmations?
  • What are evangelical Christians to think of the doctrine of original sin—especially in light of the claims commonly made by sociobiologists and evolutionary psychologists? And in what ways are questions of historical ancestry tied to belief about sin?

Past and Future Years

2016-2017: Reading Genesis in an Age of Science

2017-2018: Affirming the Doctrine of Creation in an Age of Science

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Contact Us

If you have any questions or feedback about the Stott Award for Pastoral Engagement, or would simply like to talk with someone in person, please do not hesitate to contact us:

847-317-8066

[email protected]

This project is made possible through the support of a grant from Templeton Religion Trust. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Templeton Religion Trust.

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Important Dates

(2018 — 2019 Fellowship)

January 16, 2018
2017-2018 Proposals Due

March 1, 2018
Recipients Announced

August 27, 2018
2017-2018 Fellowship begins

December 15, 2018
Fall term ends

January 14, 2019
Spring Fellowship begins

May 10, 2019
Fellowship Ends

 

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