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Date Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Time 3:30pm — 5pm CST
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Hinkson Hall, Rodine Ministry Building

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ST Symposium: Matthew Levering

The Death of Stephen (Acts 7): What His Death Teaches Us about Our Dying

Matthew Levering

January 20, 3:30pm–5:00pm

Hinkson Hall, Rodine Ministry Building

Acts 7 teaches us, among other things, that Christians die not as isolated individuals. Rather our dying belongs to the history of a people. The history of Israel and of the Church is our history. When we look at this history—our own past—sadly, we find it distorted by sin, even if it can be looked at more positively from another angle. In dying, we find our history to be gravely weighed down by sin, just as Stephen found the history of Israel. Is there, then, any hope for the dying, or have those who are dying no way of looking forward in hope? I suggest that Stephen teaches us that the answer to the burden of a sinful history—our history—consists specifically in Jesus, the Messiah who was crucified for our sins and has been raised and exalted to the right hand of the Father. Given that our history is distorted by sin, Jesus Christ has conquered sin for us and redeemed our history, so that in dying we can look forward in hope to Jesus.

This lecture is free and open to the public.
Follow online at stream.tiu.edu.

 

“Matthew Matthew Levering (PhD, Boston College) is Perry Family Foundation Professor of Theology at Mundelein Seminary, Co-Director of the Chicago Theological Initiative, and Director of the Center for Scriptural Exegesis, Philosophy, and Doctrine. He has previously served as Professor of Theology at the University of Dayton, and Associate Professor of Theology at Ave Maria University. He is the author, editor or translator of over thirty books. Some of his most recent books include Proofs of God: From Tertullian to Karl Barth (forthcoming); Natural Law: A Jewish-Christian-Islamic Trialogue (co-authored with David Novak and Anver Emon); Paul in the Summa Theologiae; The Theology of Augustine; and Jesus and the Demise of Death. His interests include dogmatic and historical Catholic theology, Thomas Aquinas, biblical and ecumenical theology, philosophical reflection on God, and Vatican II.
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